Tag: art collector

July Calm Puget Sound.

In a couple of weeks I will be moving away from Seattle. I sold my little condo on First Hill (closing in exactly 9 days) and will be packing up a U-Haul to head back east before the end of the month. I guess that’s why I feel the need to “stock up” on art made in the Pacific Northwest as my final few days living in the upper left-hand corner of the USA are slipping away.

Why am I leaving? Well that’s a story for another time.

The important thing is, this morning I found something that will forever make me think of my time in Seattle…

Here’s the backstory (in case you’re interested)…

THE START I have been trying to draw since two or three years old. First, it was funny little men with hats, then cartoons, then wanting deeply to put my version of what I saw in nature down on paper. Drawing was a world apart, which I could retreat into when the world my body inhabited was temporarily uncomfortable. My father was the son of English immigrants, so the children’s stories I was read before bed were illustrated by such great British artists as Arthur Rackham and Earnest Shepherd. These two artists influenced my style of drawing more than any others.

Black and white line drawings fascinated me for many years, as I trained my hand and eye to work together, to relax and flow. So I worked in pencil, charcoal and pen & ink for a long time, always delighting in working outdoors in nature. My family was a California family that camped and hiked, so I formed a passion for nature early on.

SCRATCHBOARD In later years I began to be drawn to woodcuts, linocuts and etchings, and experimented with these media for numbers of years, until I discovered scratchboard. What I loved about this medium was the fact that it allowed me to have the feeling of pen & ink as well as the feel of a woodcut, linocut or etching. The hand printing process of these latter media had never interested me much, so scratchboard was perfect, in that it is a drawing medium that looks like a hand-printing medium. I worked for years with the old type of scratchboard that can only be done in black & white.

http://sharonnealwilliams.com/pages/bio.html

Thank you, Seattle, for being my home for the past 7 years – for teaching me I am tougher than I thought I was and for introducing me to so many new things/experiences. I am forever indebted.

If you like it, you should buy it.

If you’ve read any of my other posts, you probably already know there isn’t much rhyme or reason to what I buy…or why I buy it. And I can’t speak for anyone else, but I would say that if you wanted to start your own art collection you *could* hit up an art show or hope to get lucky and find an original in a thrift shop (as those are both viable options). Or you might try looking around places like OfferUp or LetGo. You’d be surprised how many artists put their own pieces on sites like that.

Take this piece, for instance:

When I saw it, I fell in love. The artist listed it on LetGo for $100 and said it was an acrylic and mixed media piece. I offered him $75 and he was like, “sure.”

In my last few posts, I’ve written things like “even though this isn’t necessarily my aesthetic, I still bought it” or “doesn’t really fit my style, but I liked it anyway.” With this, those statements do not apply. I was beyond obsessed with it. It’s big, bold, bright, urban, street, has attitude and personality…everything I like.

I’m calling it “Flamingo King” and I bought it from a guy named Genaro Rivas in Tacoma, WA. I’m actually thinking about reaching back out to him to commission another piece…something similar, but perhaps with a political perspective? Haven’t decided yet. The point is, I liked it and I bought it. It is, to date, my most-prized acquisition. So go look around – on Craigslist, Facebook marketplace, apps, etc. – because you never know when you just might find your favorite piece of all time.



Beginning the Journey…

I’ve learned that art doesn’t necessarily have to be “your style” or “your aesthetic” to have a place in your house. Doesn’t matter if it doesn’t match our decor or go with the other pieces in your living room. Sometimes you can see something and know that it belongs with you anyways.

This framed print is called “Beginning the Journey” and, upon first glance, I was pretty mesmerized by it.

What better reminder could there be?

Stop. Look around. Put the phone away. Take a breath. Absorb. Be present.

And yet as simple as it sounds, it’s rarely done.

I think that was my attraction to this little print. Anything that reminds me to slow down and pay attention in life, whether it matches the color scheme in my house or not, is coming home with me.

Price: $1.99 at a thrift shop in downtown Seattle.

Place Where the Gods Come and Go…

If you’re like me, you may have never heard of Navajo sandpaintings but now that you’ve seen one you gotta admit…they’re pretty incredible, huh?

The Navajo word for sandpaintings means “place where the gods come and go.

Sandpaintings’ use four principal colors: white, blue, yellow, and black. They remind Navajos of the Four Sacred Mountains bordering their traditional homeland. These mountains and some of their associations are:

White Shell Mountain (Sierra Blanca Peak, Colorado): white-east-dawn
Turquoise Mountain (Mount Taylor, New Mexico): blue-south-day
Abalone Shell Mountain (Mount Humphreys, Arizona): yellow-west-twilight
Coal Mountain (Hesperus Peak, Colorado): black-north-darkness

http://www.collectorsguide.com/fa/fa083.shtml

The sandpainting has been used for centuries in religious rituals, including healing ceremonies performed by Navajo medicine men. A sandpainting for a ceremony is made on the ground in the ceremonial hogan and destroyed at the end of the ritual.

In order to preserve this long-standing tradition, in the late 1940’s Navajos began to create permanent sandpaintings, changing the design slightly to protect the religious significance when these paintings were shown publicly. Pictorial sandpaintings which reflect the Navajo environment and lifestyle are also made. Today sandpaintings are made by slowly trickling sand through the hand onto epoxy-covered particle boards, using sand made from naturally colored crushed rock, stone, and minerals for the different shades and colors.

http://www.penfieldgallery.com/sandPaintings/sandPaintings.html

While I don’t know the story behind this exact piece, I’m happy that I now  know more about the rituals performed and history behind the Navajo sanpaintings.