Tag: pacific northwest

July Calm Puget Sound.

In a couple of weeks I will be moving away from Seattle. I sold my little condo on First Hill (closing in exactly 9 days) and will be packing up a U-Haul to head back east before the end of the month. I guess that’s why I feel the need to “stock up” on art made in the Pacific Northwest as my final few days living in the upper left-hand corner of the USA are slipping away.

Why am I leaving? Well that’s a story for another time.

The important thing is, this morning I found something that will forever make me think of my time in Seattle…

Here’s the backstory (in case you’re interested)…

THE START I have been trying to draw since two or three years old. First, it was funny little men with hats, then cartoons, then wanting deeply to put my version of what I saw in nature down on paper. Drawing was a world apart, which I could retreat into when the world my body inhabited was temporarily uncomfortable. My father was the son of English immigrants, so the children’s stories I was read before bed were illustrated by such great British artists as Arthur Rackham and Earnest Shepherd. These two artists influenced my style of drawing more than any others.

Black and white line drawings fascinated me for many years, as I trained my hand and eye to work together, to relax and flow. So I worked in pencil, charcoal and pen & ink for a long time, always delighting in working outdoors in nature. My family was a California family that camped and hiked, so I formed a passion for nature early on.

SCRATCHBOARD In later years I began to be drawn to woodcuts, linocuts and etchings, and experimented with these media for numbers of years, until I discovered scratchboard. What I loved about this medium was the fact that it allowed me to have the feeling of pen & ink as well as the feel of a woodcut, linocut or etching. The hand printing process of these latter media had never interested me much, so scratchboard was perfect, in that it is a drawing medium that looks like a hand-printing medium. I worked for years with the old type of scratchboard that can only be done in black & white.

http://sharonnealwilliams.com/pages/bio.html

Thank you, Seattle, for being my home for the past 7 years – for teaching me I am tougher than I thought I was and for introducing me to so many new things/experiences. I am forever indebted.

Art History in the Making…

I usually paint with acrylics. I’ve done one mosaic (which took me so long I swore I would never do another) and today I woke up wanting to learn how to do photo transfers. The process entails exactly what it sounds like – taking a photo and transferring it to a canvas, piece of wood, tile, glass…anything you can paint on.

I watched a couple of YouTube videos online and decided to give it a try. There’s only one way to learn and that’s just to go for it.

Step One: I found a couple of photos to experiment with. They can be color or black and white, doesn’t matter. Just make sure they are high resolution.

Step Two: E-mail the pictures to a print/copy shop. I used Staples.

Step Three: Make sure to use Laserjet and not Inkjet printing. Also, get a couple of copies of the image you want to use just in case you mess up. This is trial and error, so it might take a couple tries.

Step Four: Get your materials. I used canvas for my first go-round because it’s a smooth surface and (I figured) the easiest to use. You will also need a gel medium, a paint brush, modge podge (to seal it when it’s done) and a sponge/cloth/spray bottle – basically anything you can use to moisten the finished product with when it’s time to peel the paper off.

Step Five: Watch a YouTube video and follow along. Trust me, you will have questions as you go and having the tutorial as a guide will be immensely helpful.

Step Six: Have fun. Seriously, what’s the point if you aren’t enjoying yourself. Pour a glass of wine and forget about everything else going on in your life.

Here’s my finished product:

My photo transfer of “Seattle at Night” was done on an 11×14 canvas…and even though I messed it up, I still kinda like it. Looks vintage.